2017 Oral Presentations

The following abstracts have been received and accepted for presentation at the 2017 Gulf Coast Conference. Additional submissions will be added to this list as they are received and accepted. Schedule for presentations is currently under development and will be listed on this website as soon as available. The printed program will be available in August.

Submitted abstracts for the 2017 Gulf Coast Conference are currently under review and accepted presentations will be posted soon. Meanwhile, you can:

> View the 2016 presentations.

Abstract # 100 - Paper

Utilizing a Novel Microfluidic Viscometer for Fast and Accurate Analysis of Materials at Low Viscosity and High Shear

Vanden Eynden, Matt; Abgrall, Patrick; Adamska, Patrycja; Lefeuvre, Yoann; Meunier, Gerard - Formulaction, Inc.

Understanding the behavior of materials under varying shear rates will help deliver quality results and projections of a materials performance. Using rheometers or rotational viscometers may not provide access to optimal viscosity and shear rate ranges with relative ease. Here, we utilize a novel device that employs a co-flow microfluidic principle to obtain the viscosity of various products as a product is run against a reference inside of a microfluidic chip. The confined, laminar flow allows access to high shear rates (> 10^5 s-1) while also performing at low viscosities (< 1 cP). Current examples and applications will be discussed.

Abstract # 103 - Paper

Stability Analysis of Ashpaltene Dispersions and Crude Oil Demulsification Mixtures Using Multiple Light Scattering

Matt Vanden Eynden - Formulaction, Inc.

Detecting phase separation events in crude oil mixtures is of importance as to alleviate processing issues and optimize formulations. Shelf tests are adequate in some regards but are subjective and can often take long times in order to see results. The Turbiscan (Formulaction, France) uses Multiple Light Scattering (MLS) to quantitatively track particle migration and phase separation kinetics. This allows for asphaltene dispersions to be quickly tested for additive effectiveness and stability as per standard methods. The fast and resolved nature of the measurement can also provide demulsification kinetics relating to water and interface quality and speed of demulsification.

Abstract # 111 - Paper

Low level measurements of benzene exposure in the workplace and at ppt levels at fencelines via gas chromatography/photoionization detection

Jennifer Maclachlan - HNU PID Analyzers LLC
John N. Driscoll - PID Analyzers, LLC

Benzene is a known carcinogen and long term exposure to this chemical may result in leukemia. The Occupational Safety and Health Adminstration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) for benzene, established in the 1980’s, was 1 ppm. In the 1980’s, tetra ethyl lead, an octane booster, was removed from gasoline and replaced with these aromatic hydrocarbons: Benzene, Toluene, Ethylene and Xylene (BTEX). In 1990, benzene was one of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPS) identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the Clean Air Act of 1990. As a result, the quantity of benzene in gasoline was gradually reduced to limit the benzene emitted to the atmosphere. In 2015, EPA announced a plan to regulate benzene at 2.8 ppb at the fenceline of refineries and chemical plants since neighbors of these facilities could experience exposure to low levels of benzene in the ambient air for 24 hours per day.

The OSHA limits (PEL = 1.0 ppm) for the workplace (chemical plants, gas pipelines, shipyards etc.) can be measured at the 1 ppm level using a portable gas chromatograph configured with a photoionization detector (GC/PID). The EPA limit of 2.8 ppb at refinery and chemical plants fence lines is near the detection limits for most GC/PID’s so a low power concentrator would be needed to measure sub ppb levels of benzene without interference from hexane or other alkanes present. A new mini hand-held GC based analyzer that will be able to measure benzene in the workplace at ppb levels and at ppt levels in refinery and chemical plant fencelines will be described.

Abstract # 112 - Paper

Hydrogen Gas Lab Servers: An Advantageous Solution for Petrochem Chromatography

Scott Accetta - Proton Onsite
John Stevenson - Proton Onsite
John Speranza - Proton OnSite

 Analyzing petroleum samples, performing hydrocarbon analyses and testing substances such as gasoline, biodiesel and natural gas can be time-critical and very costly if labs suffer delays in testing due to equipment downtime.  In many cases, laboratories procure instruments strictly based on their ability to generate fast, accurate results.  On-site hydrogen gas generation is the preferred source of carrier gas supply for chromatography equipment in the petrochemical industry due to its benefits of safety, reliability, and consistent composition.  Further, On-Site hydrogen generators are compact, streamlined systems that produce the carrier gas required on demand without the hassle and danger of high-pressure cylinder delivery.  Supporting petrochemical, refining, and chemical processing applications, Proton OnSite’s G4800 “Lab Server” hydrogen generator is ideally suited for testing environments that require multiple gas chromatographs.  The G4800 is the only generator large enough to handle all carrier gas requirements from a single source.  This unit employs Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) cell stack technology to produce a reliable stream of ultra-high purity hydrogen (99.9999%) for point use.  This presentation aims to illustrate the advantageous results yielded by a Lab Server at a customer site performing petrochemical analyses.  In this instance, the customer sought alternatives to hydrogen delivery and explored procurement of on-site gas generation equipment.  Rather than opting for multiple gas generators, to support the hydrogen demand at their facility, this customer elected to implement a single centralized unit to conserve lab footprint, cost, and maintenance requirements. 

Abstract # 113 - Paper

The importance of chloride measurement in petroleum samples.

Michael C. Pohl - HORIBA Instruments, Inc.

Chloride is a ubiquitous element in earth's environment and plays a very large role in the Petroleum Industry.  In many environments it plays a very beneficial role, but in this industry it often has very detrimental effects.  From corrosion of metal components at a refinery to catalyst poisoning at a chemical plant, it has the potential to cost chemical processors huge sums of money. The problems are magnified because many processes are continuous and so even low concentrations can have a cumulative effect over time.

Chloride levels are typically low, which is a bit of a mixed blessing. They do not do their damage at a very rapid rate, but at typical PPM levels, are difficult to remove and challenging to quantitate. As with many Petroleum related challenges, over the years, a number of ASTM Methods have beeen written to address the acceptable levels of chloride and also how they can be determined. The specifications, as well as the appropriate analytical methods, will be reviewed and discussed. They will also be applied to very specific petroleum samples.

One of the most popular methods in use today is the combustion - microcoulometric analysis. This very simple, well-known method can easily be applied to petroleum samples. The technique will be discussed in detail as well as the components attached to a typical system. The ASTM and ISO metods, which reference this technique, will be illustrated. The fuel and other petroleum specifications will be discusssed relative to the inclusion of these methods in the specification.

Abstract # 117 - Paper

Multi-Element Analysis of Petroleum Crude Oils using ICP-MS

Jenny Nelson - Agilent

In the petrochemical industry, certain analytes are known to impact the performance and value of the final product. Consequently, there are several ASTM methods on the elemental analysis of oils, lubricants and fuels. One example is standard test method ASTM D7111-15a for the determination of trace elements in middle distillate fuels which uses Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method is widely used in the industry, but as specifications for fuels become more stringent, some laboratories are favoring the more sensitive analytical technique of ICP-MS, which provides significantly lower detection limits than ICP-OES. To reflect this trend, the first ASTM ICP-MS method for petroleum has been balloted in D0203. This is likely to be followed by an ICP-MS method for petroleum crude oils. This presentation describes how the Agilent 7900 ICP-MS was used to analyze different types of crude oil samples following simple dilution in an organic solution containing o-xylene. The aim was to develop a method that is suitable for routine use in the petroleum refining industry, particularly in high sample volume facilities, where turnaround time is critical. For this study, a wide range of samples were tested, and various quality control measures were taken. A series of 18 petroleum crude oil samples were used in the study. The chosen samples had a diverse set of properties; a wide range of American Petroleum Institute (API) gravity, elemental composition, hydrocarbon (H/C) content, and densities were selected. As a performance check, the 7900 ICP-MS was used to analyze diluted NIST 1634c standard multiple times per day with measurements taken over the course of a few months. The results show excellent recoveries for the certified elements V and Ni within + 10%, with good agreement. The recoveries for the non-certified elements As and Se in the SRM were within + 10%.

Abstract # 118 - Paper

Transferring Routine Lab GC Analysis to Automatic On-Line Measurement

Ulrich Gokeler - Siemens Industry Inc.

Continuously laboratory analysis is performed multiple times a day to support product quality and process control. By transferring those routine lab analyses to an automatic and on-line measurement system, there can be significant cost savings. Measurement point dependent, because higher measurement frequency and repeatable sample conditions possibly enable improved process and quality control. This presentation will discuss the possible benefits of transferring laboratory GC measurements, especially pointing out considerations reaching from measurement focus to ROI.    

Abstract # 119 - Seminar/Workshop - 10/3/2017 - 9:30 AM - Room 371 E

Microspectroscopic Sampling – FT-IR and Raman Microscopy

Steve McQueen - Thermo Fisher Scientific

This workshop will highlight the advantages of using Infrared and Raman microscopy techniques in the analysis of micro-scale materials.   The presentation will illustrate various applications of both microscopy techniques and the advantages of each based on the type of materials being analyzed.

Abstract # 120 - Seminar/Workshop - 10/3/2017 - 10:20 AM - Room 371 E

FTIR /Raman Theory and Sample Handling

Cam MacIsaac - Thermo Fisher Scientific

This workshop will cover the theory behind several spectroscopic techniques including Fourier transform Infrared technique. It will review what happens to molecules when they are exposed to the infrared. It will cover an overview of how spectra are recorded using the FT technique. It will also cover the theory behind several common IR sampling techniques and explore their usages.

Abstract # 121 - Seminar/Workshop - 10/3/2017 - 10:50 AM - Room 371 E

Omnic Software Tutorial for IR/Raman Spectroscopy

Cam MacIsaac - Thermo Fisher Scientific
Dr. Robert Jones - Thermo Fisher Scientific

This workshop will cover Omnic software, the popular platform for running Thermo Fisher FT-IR, FT-NIR, and Raman spectrometers. A live software demonstration will be given to highlight features of Omnic, which will include collection of data from a working spectrometer. A live demonstration of TQ software will be given illustrating FTIR, FT-NIR and Raman quantitative and qualitative methods. Suggestions will be given on how to diagnose chemometric methods to ensure they accurately predict. Some pitfalls will be covered to avoid improperly modeled methods.  In addition, an overview of Macros/Basic automated workflow software will be given. This software is designed to build pre-program quantitative predictions. The Macros language can also automate many other software functions, like basic kinetic routines.

Abstract # 122 - Seminar/Workshop - 10/3/2017 - 1:00 PM - Room 371 E

FT-IR Spectral Interpretation and Problem Solving

Dr. Robert Jones - Thermo Fisher Scientific

This talk will give an overview of FT-IR interpretation by focusing on several common functional groups. It will cover major hydrocarbons including aliphatic, olefinic and aromatic groups. Additionally, it will discuss carbonyl groups like esters, ketones and carboxylic acids. It is designed to give an understanding of commonly seen infrared bands and to help better understand infrared data.

Abstract # 123 - Seminar/Workshop - 10/3/2017 - 1:45 PM - Room 371 E

Material Characterization – Extrusion techniques for Polymer and Crude Oil Industries

Steve Watts - Thermo Fisher Scientific

Small, lab-scale extrusion systems provide unique opportunities for material characterization and process development.  Formulation studies and a comprehensive understanding of a material's processability can be realized and rapid process development for direct scale-up leads to improved efficiency due to increased time-to-results and reduced cost of materials.  In addition, the creation of sample products, whether injection molded specimens (discs or bars) or final product simulation (sheets, blown film), provides additional analytical opportunities and insight to the material's properties.  Depending on the requirements, various types of systems can be used including micro-compounders, bench-top extruders and torque rheometers, and these will be discussed here.

Abstract # 124 - Seminar/Workshop - 10/4/2017 - 9:30 AM - Room 371 E

Microspectroscopic Sampling – FT-IR and Raman Microscopy

Steve McQueen - Thermo Fisher Scientific

This workshop will highlight the advantages of using Infrared and Raman microscopy techniques in the analysis of micro-scale materials.   The presentation will illustrate various applications of both microscopy techniques and the advantages of each based on the type of materials being analyzed.

Abstract # 125 - Seminar/Workshop - 10/4/2017 - 10:20 AM - Room 371 E

Theory and Sample Handling

Cam MacIsaac - Thermo Fisher Scientific

This workshop will cover the theory behind several spectroscopic techniques including Fourier transform Infrared technique. It will review what happens to molecules when they are exposed to the infrared. It will cover an overview of how spectra are recorded using the FT technique. It will also cover the theory behind several common IR sampling techniques and explore their usages.

Abstract # 126 - Seminar/Workshop - 10/4/2017 - 10:50 AM - Room 371 E

Omnic Software Tutorial for IR/Raman Spectroscopy

Cam MacIsaac - Thermo Fisher Scientific
Dr. Robert Jones - Thermo Fisher Scientific

This workshop will cover Omnic software, the popular platform for running Thermo Fisher FT-IR, FT-NIR, and Raman spectrometers. A live software demonstration will be given to highlight features of Omnic, which will include collection of data from a working spectrometer. A live demonstration of TQ software will be given illustrating FTIR, FT-NIR and Raman quantitative and qualitative methods. Suggestions will be given on how to diagnose chemometric methods to ensure they accurately predict. Some pitfalls will be covered to avoid improperly modeled methods.  In addition, an overview of Macros/Basic automated workflow software will be given. This software is designed to build pre-program quantitative predictions. The Macros language can also automate many other software functions, like basic kinetic routines.

Abstract # 127 - Seminar/Workshop - 10/4/2017 - 1:00 PM - Room 371 E

FT-IR Spectral Interpretation and Problem Solving

Dr. Robert Jones - Thermo Fisher Scientific

This talk will give an overview of FT-IR interpretation by focusing on several common functional groups. It will cover major hydrocarbons including aliphatic, olefinic and aromatic groups. Additionally, it will discuss carbonyl groups like esters, ketones and carboxylic acids. It is designed to give an understanding of commonly seen infrared bands and to help better understand infrared data.

Abstract # 128 - Seminar/Workshop - 10/4/2017 - 1:45 PM - Room 371 E

Material Characterization – Rheology for Polymer and Crude Oil Industries

Steve Watts - Thermo Fisher Scientific

The petrochemical and polymer industries utilize rheology to better understand their materials and how they behave under controlled conditions. This allows users to gain insight into their processes and solve real-world challenges. Relevant applications would include the determination of physical properties (viscoelasticity, molecular weights and distribution, transition temperatures, extensional viscosity), processability (degradation, curing) and flow under extreme conditions (high pressure and temperatures). Here, we will discuss several methods that employ rotational rheometers, extensional rheometers and torque rheometers to address these challenges.

Abstract # 130 - Seminar/Workshop

Electrochemistry Field Analysis of Industrial Wastewater and Fluids

Sean Bard - Hanna Instruments
Ryan Martin - Hanna Instruments

Changes in the environmental landscape with regards to the effects of petroleum E&P on water have had a great influence on the need for electrochemical field analysis.  Fast, measurable, and accurate results are key.  This presentation seeks to provide insight into what parameters these analysts are concerned with, and their potential impact.  

Abstract # 131 - Seminar/Workshop

Karl Fisher Titration for Surface Water Analysis in Dry Chemicals

Sean Bard - Hanna Instruments
Ryan Martin - Hanna Instruments

Analaysis of both Surface and Total Water content of dry chemical using Karl Fisher titration is very important in the Industrial Sector.  Such calculations add clarity to a myriad of dry chemical applications and usages, both in oil & gas and elsewhere.  This presentation seeks to define method and procedure of this type of analysis, as well as the value and importance of the data it yields.

Abstract # 132 - Paper

Simplified method to measure performance capabilities of laboratory analytical instruments in the oil and gas industry

George Gonzalez - Agilent Technologies
Dr. Raj Shah - Koehler Instrument Company

A simplified review method to measure performance capabilities for commercial analytical instruments is required. The energy and chemicals industry would greatly benefit from a reliable and straightforward statistically-based system which allows for determining the value-added performance of any test method. The proposed process and computational expression will determine the overall analytical performance value (APV) based on precision criteria relative to parameter measurements. The APV technique can then be used to compare any standard developed for testing the same parameter. Its numerical rating system will express performance measurements relative to two or more points within the operating value of each parameter featured in any standard method that exhibits full precision as defined by repeatability and reproducibility. In turn, this evaluation can justify the precision for between-laboratory testing in order to standardize the methods performed in an efficient way. Applying a more streamlined statistical approach such as the APV technique would assist laboratory personnel including managers, process engineers, chemists, technicians, and operators with its effects even reaching as far as commercial traders. 

Abstract # 133 - Seminar/Workshop

Laboratory Ventilation "More is Not Necessarily Better"

Karl Aveard LEED-AP - Gray & Green Laboratory Systems, Inc.

French philosophers say, "The wise do as much as they should, not as much as they can." Oversized HVAC systems in the hot humid climates of Texas and Louisiana are common. An attitude of "more must be better" equals system creep; pay me now and pay me later. This can be avoided with thoughtful and informed decisions during the early design phases. Those decisions include proper product selection; using excellent source capture with task specific devices, plus taking advantage of new and innovative technologies. Codes and best practices have evolved resulting in more GREEN approaches to earth friendly lab design. Selecting an experienced laboratory design team is paramount.  

Abstract # 134 - Training Course

Determination of Water Content in Petroleum using Solubilized Solvents with Karl Fischer Titration

Bruce Herzig - Millipore Sigma

Water content in petroleum products can be difficult. Let us show you how saturated hydrocarbons in most cases can be titrated according to standard methods.  When overcoming solubility problems of non-polar or weakly polar substances, the addition of a solubilizer to the solvent is necessary. Learn more about why long-chain and cyclic hydrocarbons, long-chain alcohols and chloroform are recommended.    In addition, petroleum products are mixtures of long-chain or aromatic hydrocarbons and are hardly soluble in methanol.  Learn more about which solubilizers to use for water determination by Karl Fischer and when a KF oven technique should be utilized.  

Abstract # 135 - Paper

CO and CO2 analysis - Restek's simplified approach

Mark Badger - Restek Corporation
Katarina Oden - Restek Corporation
Jaap de Zeeuw - Restek Corporation

The analysis of CO and CO2 can be challenging; the concentration and matrix can affect what detection method and column type that need to be selected to get good, reliable data.  In this presentation we will discuss the options available to the chromatographer, and also discuss the simplified approach that Restek suggests using a combination of Restek's Shincarbon column in with the new Restek Methanizer.

Abstract # 137 - Paper

Rapid Monitoring of Antioxidant Content in Used Engine Oil by DART - AccuTOF Mass Spectrometry

Paul Harvath - General Motors
Robert B. Cody - Jeol Corp
A. John Dane - Jeol Corp

Analysis of automobile engine oil samples taken at 20 hour intervals of a 100 hour dynamometer test with direct analysis in real time (DART) time of flight mass spectrometry has been used to identify and monitor the diphenylamine antioxidants in the oil. This monitoring of antioxidant content is a preemptive way to determine when an engine oil will begin to rapidly oxidize due to lack of antioxidant protection. The speed of this technique may be useful in monitoring an oil's ability to mitigate oxidation during engine dynamometer testing.

Abstract # 139 - Paper

Elemental Detection of Chromium in Aqueous Media by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS): An Approach Toward Surface Quantitation of Deposited Over-Layer Films

Hylton G. McWhinney - Prairie View A&M University
Tony L. Grady - Prairie View A&M University
Deana J. Gilbert - Prairie View A&M university

Rigorous sample preparation is generally necessary for the analysis of metals in aqueous systems. The potential application of SEM-EDS to elucidate qualitative and quantitative information on toxic metals in aqueous systems, was investigated.  The technique is based on over-layer/substrate  analysis.  Chromium in the form of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in deionized and a synthetic waste water was investigated.  Graphical computation of Cr/substrate ratios versus Cr(III) standards, yielded a R2 value of 0.7841.  Least square analysis of the 5.56 ppm solution gave a value of 5.23 ppm.  The comparative percentage error for this concentration discrepancy between the two values was only 5.40%.

Abstract # 140 - Paper

Coatings that improve the reliability, stability and performance of sampling systems used in analysis of ammonia and NOX compounds.

Gary Barone - SilcoTek Corporation

The last 15 years have shown an increasing need for coatings to improve analytical results obtained from systems used for mercury and sulfur sampling. As a result of increased regulation, sampling system performance must be rugged and stable, even in challenging and corrosive environments, while also reliable in order to meet frequent calibration inertness checks. To meet these stringent standards, the use of coatings has been specified or highly recommended. The data presented here will compare the stability of ammonia and NOx compounds on a variety of surfaces. Additionally, this presentation will address and summarize reports to-date on how coatings have been used to effectively improve the accuracy and reliability of sampling systems across several applications. Many industries have unique challenges that are solved by high durability, inert coatings that are designed to enhance chemical compatibility.

Abstract # 141 - Paper

Process Raman Gas Analysis In Refining

Susan P. Harris - Endress+Hauser
Scott Sutherland, Ph.D. - SpectraSensors, Inc.

On-line process measurement of the composition of gas streams in refining, fertilizer, and other manufacturing industries is essential for the optimal operation of different process units within these facilities.  Process analyzers based on gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and electrochemical technologies are commonly used in these facilities.  However, process conditions for certain streams present major challenges for these traditional technologies.  Techniques based on optical spectroscopy, including near-infrared (NIR), infrared (dispersive and Fourier transform), and Raman spectroscopy, can provide analysis solutions for these challenging stream conditions.  Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for streams containing homonuclear diatomic gases, such as H2 and N2. Hydrogen is an essential feedstock for the hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and catalytic reforming of various hydrocarbon fractions in refineries. A case study will be presented for optimization with the analysis of hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide and other compounds in the hydrogen recycle process in a refinery hydrotreater/hydrocracker and for hydrogen purity measurements in a hydrogen plant.  

Abstract # 144 - Paper

How scientific companies use the Talent Supply Chain Management model to link human capital to business needs to increase productivity and efficiency

Harvey Yau - KellyOCG

Just like the conventional supply chain management, talent supply chain management model (TSCM) is an adaptable process of mobilizing and engaging resources on an as-needed basis, creating a lean, streamlined system of input and output. Because it offers oversight as to where talent is sourced, how it's engaged, and how it performs, TSCM allows companies to align their talent strategies with organizational objectives, optimize their workforces, and maximize the potential of their human capital-all while minimizing superfluous and inefficient processes. And by engaging vendors and labor in a manner that's in line with organizational goals, TSCM in effect creates an integrated or holistic system in which each part of the supply chain supports the rest. TSCM offers companies significant competitive advantages, including: • Enhanced workforce planning. • Oversight. • Predictive capability. • Risk mitigation. • Access to a broader talent pool.

Learning Objective 1 To teach attendees how to use the TSCM model to minimize risk associated in human capital when outsource project work: Risk mitigation. TSCM provides complete oversight as to sourcing and deployment of talent. At the same time, it yields data about quality. This enables companies to establish robust IP protection and risk mitigation policies and processes that are integrated with those of their vendors. Learning Objective 2 Workforce Planning Training. The issue is often overlooked. We will present the most effective and creative way to manage attendees' organization's talent asset by evaluating all possible sources of talent in a holistic manner and knowing how to engage workers, companies are better equipped to make sound decisions that are aligned with their overall objectives. We will also cover talent strategy that provides data about the deployment and performance of talent. When carefully analyzed and measured against industry best practices, it facilitates the fine-tuning of strategies to better meet organizational objectives Learning Objective 3 We will cover the advantages to manage projects and different work functional areas with Statement of Work strategies. The "SOW" strategy has been adopted by many leading scientific companies globally. We will also provide examples how the engineered workforce management models can be tailored to the specific needs of core or non-core functions of laboratory or scientific operations. The strategy has been adopted by many leading biotechnology, pharmaceutical, environmental consulting, chemical, energy and other companies in various other sectors to achieve tangible results in the functional areas of analytical testing, stability sample management, lab management, QA/QC Support, chemical inventory & maintenance and animal husbandry services.

 

Abstract # 146 - Paper

System Integration Tool Based on Excel

Dr Scot D Abbott - Phoenix

We have applied a system integration tool called DAQ2GO to revive broken instruments, make whole instruments, and add automation to others. This system is based in Excel(R) and uses high performance electronics in a way that does not require special programming or electronic skill.

This talk will provide several examples, including a custom GC with 4 columns and 6 detectors, a mechanical tester, a high performance relative viscometer, robotic automation tool, and evaluations of commercial instruments. A comparison to a programmable controller is provided.